Vote for Next Week’s Classic Collection – To Be Delivered Week of August 2nd

 

Hallo all!



When you get a chance, pop over to my Facebook page at  
http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/HBloomcom/164129383642?ref=ts to vote for next week's Classic Collection bundle.  The option that accumulates the most votes will be the one that my team produces for all subscribers next week.  I'll keep the voting open until Noon tomorrow (Friday), at which time I'll place my order to receive the stems from my international contingent of growers.  If you don't have a Facebook page, or would prefer to let me know your vote directly, simply shoot me an email at hbloom@hbloom.com.



Happy voting!

This Week’s Classic Collection: Week of 7/26/2010

Friends, Fans, & Followers:

I was accused of botanical bias the other day. An old study-hall mate of mine from my University days, on reading my latest batch of blogs, accused me of becoming a slave to the far-flung-and-unusual. Contrasting “the-way-it-was” with the “way-it-is” she claims that life was better when things were more simple. While I tend to agree with her that the best things in life are indeed those that have been around forever, I was steadfast in my insistence that in the flower world, tradition can co-exist quite happily with newly-accessible rarities. And to prove it, I created Option B – the bundle that you all selected for this week’s Classic Collection. You see, at the heart of this week’s bundle is the pink “sweet unique” rose – a classic to be sure – but I’ve added a bit of “what the bloody hell is that?!” by contrasting the roses with lemon-lime celosia against a backdrop of mossy green trachelium.

Given that the pink “sweet unique” rose is at crux of my defense, I hope you won’t mind if I dwell on this particular varietal a bit longer than usual. To start, I had flew this particular batch in form a very special place indeed. In other words, these roses aren’t the sort that you might find growing on the roadside in Tyler, Texas (one of America’s prime rose cultivation centers; no offense to the good people of Tyler… and to be fair to them, I fully acknowledge that they’ve done a fine job of fulfilling every lustful teen’s prom-going needs with ubiquitous bundles of deep-dark-red roses). Rather, I procured this wonderful parcel of pinks from someone I met while on holiday in Brasil a few years back. Luiza Bernardes, of straight-line Portuguese descent, splits her time between a sizable boutique growing operation in Colombia and making tourists blush on the beaches of Ipanema. Based near Rio, she commutes weekly to Colombia to oversee her interests in Santa Fe de Bogota (so, strictly-speaking, I suppose you could say these flowers actually came from Colombia, but since I can think of little else now that I’ve started talking about Luiza, I hope you’ll pardon my lack of geographic specificity). But, I digress… As you’ll see, the “sweet uniques” in your bundle are soft pink with hints of white. Perhaps more importantly for the case that I’m trying to make, botanically speaking, pink roses are the great-great-grand-mother of the modern rose that you may be more familiar with. Hundreds of years ago (no hyperbole!), before Empress Josephine (Napoleon’s mistress, then wife, then ex-wife) used her throne and title to sponsor widespread rose cultivation, pink was the predominant color found in wild species. Only after many rounds of hybridization were the nurserymen of the time able to produce and purify alternative colors. It follows then that pink roses were the original symbol for love and gratitude, conferring various nuances of symbolism onto other shades. For example, dark pink now stands for appreciation while light pink has assumed the banner of admiration. These are all good reasons to like a flower, no doubt… but being a romantic at heart, I’m proud to say that this varietal – even after many years of tinkering – remains a strong contender for prettiest flower in the bunch, even when compared to the bevy of bathing beauties – and Luiza herself – that Ipanema has to offer.

Into the mix, I’ve added celosia and trachelium. You’ll recognize the trachelium in your bundle as tiny green tubular flowers; they’re the ones blooming in a flat cluster at the end of their stems. They’re a star in their own right, named as they are for the Greek word “trachelos” (meaning “neck”) because they’ve long been thought of as a salve for all manner of throat ailments (hence being known in books of double-double-toil-and-trouble variety as “throatwort”). In this case, though, I simply think they’re an appropriate backdrop for the more pizazz-y celosia. The celosia, also known as “cockscomb” given that in some varietals the blooms resembles a rooster’s crest, is the source of my friend’s angst but in my view – as I hope you’ll agree – is a wonderful texture-y complement to the tradition represented by the “sweet uniques”. These stems, in particular, are known as “brain celosia” because of their contorted blooms and have a soft fuzziness that begs to be felt. They came to me from my man on the ground at the Auction, although even he couldn’t tell me the exact origins.

So, there you have it – the best of the old mixed in with what I think is some of the best of the now-accessible new. I hope I’ve made my case. More importantly, I hope you’ll enjoy your flowers. If you’re new to Blooming, pop your bundle out of its cellophane wrapper (taking care to drain the reservoir first) and then simply pop your stems into the included vase with room-temperature water.

Case closed,


 

H.BLOOM Weekly Deal: 2 Extraordinary Arrangements

Hallo All!

I have two particularly extraordinary arrangements for you this week.  The first is a traditional bundle filled with one of my favorite flowers – the Gloriosa.  I'm having these special gloriosas shipped in directly from Malaysia.  I've coupled the gloriosas with the dark pink celosia (otherwise known as cockscomb), which I've ordered from my growers in Indonesia.  This bouquet would regularly be sold for $75 plus delivery, but this week, I'm offering it for only $49, including delivery!  The second arrangement, a modern structure, combines large callalillies with especially artsy aspidistra leaves.  While normally found for $100 or more in Manhattan boutiques, it's available today for only $59 including delivery!

To order now (before they're all gone!), call me at (646)-873-6266.

Or, to order online:

1) Go to the last page of my "Send a One-Time Gift" Section by clicking here - www.hbloom.com/shop
2) Enter the delivery zip code 
3) Choose from the two weekly deals on the last page (page 4 of 4)

Thanks very much for visiting H.BLOOM!  I look forward to delighting you soon.  If you have any questions or feedback, don't hesitate to email me at hbloom@hbloom.com.

Cheers,

This Week’s Exotic Collection: Week of July 19th

Friends, Fans, & Followers:

I think there’s something romantic about the notion of finding something that the locals find mundane in their part of the world, only to watch that very same object elicit squeals of delight when on home turf.  Whenever I travel, I fancy myself to be an explorer in the vein of all the greats – Columbus, Vasco da Gama, Marco Polo – and I imagine that my travels have been underwritten by the Crown of some European country and that I’ve been sent off to distant lands with an entourage of porters to bring back some odd trinket or charm for the King or Queen back home to show off to his or her fellow courtiers.  Admittedly, I may well have a bit of an over-active imagination… but all the same, I’ve just come back from a world-over trip and have brought back some wonderfully unique items for those of you that subscribe to my Exotic Collection:  gloriosa, scabiosa, veronica, Azorean hydrangea, and Thai curcuma.

The first item from my travel chest is hot pink gloriosa.  In the wild, gloriosa ranges in color from green-yellow, to yellow proper, to orange and red, but the hot pink batch that I was able to secure is exceedingly rare.  This particular parcel was grown by a close friend of mine by the name of Alfonso Lim.  Alfonso, of mixed Chinese and Portuguese descent, grows gloriosa just outside of Malacca Town on the southwestern coast of the Malaysian peninsula and I think you’ll find these flowers to be just as flamboyant as Alfonso himself. 

Next, I’ve included light blue scabiosa from the foothills of the Julian Alps (part of the mountain range that stretches between northeastern Italy all the way to Slovenia).  I hope you won’t find yourself switched off by its name (although, to be fair, it does have a disastrous one, titled as it is after the contagious skin disease known as scabies) especially since it has such wonderfully delicate petals.  In fact, let’s just call it by its much more sweet-sounding nickname:  pincushion flower.  Usually a darker lavender color (or creamy white), this nectar-rich batch is a cross between the more common varieties and in the late 1700s was the subject of quite a bit of botanical controversy.  Apparently, two Austrian chaps got into a tussle of he-said and she-said over who was the first to discover the flower.  Whether you give credit to Belsazar Hacquet or to Anton Kerne von Marilaun, I think you’ll find them gorgeous.  

To follow, I’ve added in pink veronica, the long thin blooms in your bundle.  These came from my man in Ecuador (so I can’t really take credit for having “brought them back” but I hope you’ll give me credit nonetheless).  If you’re into symbolism, pink veronica (so named to honor St. Veronica who, as you may know if you were made to suffer through Sunday School as I was, gave Jesus her vail to mop his brow as carried his cross to Golgotha) stands for fidelity but I included them simply because I think their spire-shape adds a touch of elegance to the bundle. 

Into the mix I added antique Dutch hydrangea.  Despite their name, these flowers didn’t come from Holland.  Rather, I brought them back from Flores Island (part of the Azores, off the coast of Portugal).  Flores, which you must visit if you have the chance, is absolutely stunning and is home to both numerous cultivators and to a seemingly endless supply of wild fields of hydrangea.  This particular bunch of stems I collected while on tour with an old mate of mine, Joao Fonseca, to see the lighthouse at Ponta do Albernaz. 

Finally, to wrap up my world tour, I picked for you a vibrant fistful of wild pink curcuma.  Part of the same species from whence turmeric and ginger comes (indeed, curcuma is named for the Arabic word for turmeric – “kurkum”), this curcuma grows wild in northern Thailand.  No kidding – in and about Pa Hin Ngam National Park in the Chaiyaphym province of Thailand, you can find carpets and carpets of wild pink curcuma which is why, in some quarters, you’ll hear some refer to this flower as Siam Tulip (and while they are a bit tulip-y, they’re not tulips at all). 

So there you have it – treasures from far-away lands, indeed!  If you’ve been Blooming for a while, then you’re an expert by now.  If you’re new, then up-end your bundle over a sink to drain the cellophane reservoir, unwrap your bundle, and set your flowers into the included vase.  Give them a good drink of room temperature water and then enjoy!

From Around The World,

Vote for Next Week’s Classic Collection – To Be Delivered Week of July 26th

Hallo all!



When you get a chance, pop over to my Facebook page at  
http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/HBloomcom/164129383642?ref=ts to vote for next week's Classic Collection bundle.  The option that accumulates the most votes will be the one that my team produces for all subscribers next week.  I'll keep the voting open until Noon tomorrow (Friday), at which time I'll place my order to receive the stems from my international contingent of growers.  If you don't have a Facebook page, or would prefer to let me know your vote directly, simply shoot me an email at hbloom@hbloom.com.



Happy voting!

This Week’s Classic Collection: Week of July 19th

Friends, Fans, & Followers:

I’m so pleased that you picked Option A for this week. Nothing is brighter than white hot, and that’s the theme I picked for this week’s Classic using white lisianthus, cream “Vendela” roses (whitish!), and white football chrysanthemums. So, let’s start with the lisianthus shall we?

The lisianthus in your bundle are the bell-shaped flowers with flaring petals (indeed, in some instances the petals flare to the point of making the flowers look more trumpet-ish than bell-ish). This particular batch is from my man in Ecuador, from his farm just south of Quito. Name-wise, they’ve quite a boastful scientific name, Eustoma grandiflorum (say that last part out loud in a Pavarotti-esque tenor and you’ll know what I mean) but I vastly prefer the comfortable nick-name “Texas Bluebell” which, to me at least, sounds so much more friendly doesn’t it?

Next, I’ve included cream “Vendela” roses from a medium-sized grower (La Frontera) whose operations in Popayan (a solid few hour drive south from Cali, southeast of Munchique National Park in Colombia) are well-known for producing robust hybrid tea roses. They’ve large heads and while they will most likely arrive in bud form on your doorstep, they’ll open into a cup-shaped bloom with well-defined, slightly curled edges. I’m especially given to them because in addition to their milky complexion, you can often find hints of pink or green on the edge of the petals. Even more interesting, the Vendela rose is often considered the mother of all modern roses. You see, a French nursery-man by the name of Jean-Baptiste Guillot – all the way back in 1867 – birthed the Vendela by crossing a rose affectionately called Madame Bravy with an equally fetching (I would imagine!) Madame Verdier (they made, if you like, quite the – ahem – threesome). Then, in an unusually magnanimous gesture for a Frenchman, he showed and shared his creation throughout Europe igniting quite the botanical orgy of rose-making!

But I digress… Lastly, I’ve included white football chrysanthemums, also from Colombia. As anyone with even middling powers of observation will tell you, these flowers are so-named because they’re positively massive. They’re the largest varietal in the Mum family and are indeed some of the largest flowers you may ever come across. Our friends in The Orient (China and Japan, in particular) have been carrying on an epic love affair with chrysanthemums for centuries, renaming cities for the flower and adopting its visage as on royal seals and such. Here in the US, I’m just pleased to report that these flowers are usually meant to stand for positivity and cheerfulness, both of which are in steady supply in my workshop.

If this is your first week receiving flowers, unwrap your bundle over a sink so as to avoid making a mess and then set your bundle into room temperature water in the included vase. If you’ve been Blooming for some time, then I suspect you’re already fawning over your flowers.

Cheers,

H.BLOOM Weekly Deal: 2 Summer Styles


Hallo and welcome to H.BLOOM.  Mine is a new internet company, providing customers all over NYC with luxurious flowers at affordable prices.  Time Out New York has called H.BLOOM "one of its obsessions".  Real Simple Magazine called it "a genius idea".

I've got two different summer-y options available for my special weekly deal.  I selected these two as perfect flowers to brighten up your apartment/house, for a date during Restaurant Week, a dinner party with friends, a trip to the beach, or a quick "thinking of you this summer" gift.  The first is a traditional hand-tied bundle in a 5×5 cylindrical vase, priced at $39 (normally $65 + delivery!).  The second is a structural arrangement of cymbidium orchids for $49 (normally $125!).  Both prices include the flowers, vase and delivery in NYC!

To order now (before they're all gone!), call me at (646)-873-6266.

Or, to order online:

1) Go to the last page of my "Send a One-Time Gift" Section by clicking here - www.hbloom.com/shop
2) Enter the delivery zip code 
3) Choose from the two weekly deals on the last page (page 4 of 4)

Thanks very much for visiting H.BLOOM!  I look forward to delighting you soon.  If you have any questions or feedback, don't hesitate to email me at hbloom@hbloom.com.

Cheers,

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